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Health and Wellness

Mental Wellness Tip

DVHS PTSA

Mental Wellness Tip

Promote Resilience: Adversity is a natural part of life and being resilient is important to overcoming challenges and good mental health. Connectedness, competency, helping others, and successfully facing difficult situation can foster resilience.

Develop competencies: Children need to know that they can overcome challenges and accomplish goals through their actions. Achieving academic success and developing individual talents and interests helps children feel competent and more able to deal with stress positively.

Social competency is also important. Having friends and staying connected to friends and loved ones can enhance mental wellness.

Mental Wellness Committee's Tip

Mental Wellness Committee's Tip

Simple strategies you and your family

can use to help ease the stress in your teen:

Be available. Teens often appreciate being able to connect with you at the end of their school day, so try to be available either in person or on the phone when your teen gets home from school. Even if your budding adult complains, be persistent. You want to make connecting part of your routine. Walking or driving home together and having uninterrupted dinners provide other great opportunities to bond and communicate.

Stay connected. As students grow older, they often share less with parents/caregivers, but that doesn't mean you should be less aware of how they're feeling. Send encouraging texts or personal notes in their book bag to help reduce anxiety and let them know that they are not alone at school, even if they may feel that way. Take time to listen and discuss experiences that may appear to be scary or challenging. Spend time each day talking to your teen about what happened in school. Give positive feedback about their new experiences.

Mental Wellness Tip

Mental Wellness Tip for the day! 

School is back in session, which can be a stressful time for teens and parents alike. The transition from a more relaxed summer schedule to a new school year, filled with new faces, new classes, homework and more scheduled activities, can bring about a mix of anxiety, anticipation and excitement. The good news is that there are some simple strategies that you and your family can use to help ease back into the school routine.

Reinforce good sleep habits. Getting plenty of rest and sleep are important not only for good grades and staying awake, but also for preventing depression and other mental health issues. Establish a reasonable bedtime routine for your teen and let them know that sleep is important. We encourage you to check out (and share) this article on the importance of sleep, "Teens Need More Sleep Than You Think" by Dr. Michael Breus in the March 30, 2017 issue of FamilyHealthTechnology

2018-19 Mental Wellness Committee
2018-19 Mental Wellness Committee